Job Opportunity: Chief Technology Officer / CTO / VP of Engineering

Job Opportunity: Chief Technology Officer / CTO / VP of Engineering

Be Sociable, Share! Tweet We’re working with an Albany NY based company in the e-commerce affiliate market (Amazon Affiliate, eBay Affiliate, etc.) that had enterprise software and is now offering a SaaS product based on it. They have a decent amount of existing revenue/MRR for this product. The existing VP of Engineering is leaving and they might be looking to replace the entire dev team when this happens. The code has limited scalability and documentation, and the development processes (release planning, release cycles, etc.) are immature. They are looking for a leader that can hit the ground running and build a new development team (2-3 people to start, growing within 6 months, with some external funding to help) very fast. This leader does not need to be an active coder but meeting as many of the the following criteria as possible is important. We understand it’s a big list and we definitely don’t expect anyone to meet all of our requirements. Leadership and Knowledge Working on code is a low priority in this role, but a former coder who has moved into leadership is desired. They need to know what’s easy to develop and what’s complex, and should be able to review code and understand what it’s doing (or not doing). But we want a leader first and a coder second. The ability to assess and implement processes such as components of Agile, continuous development, and testing frameworks and approaches. The ability to put in appropriate processes and tools for managing this team and their code, and to develop appropriate KPI’s to measure progress and cause/effect of the departmental work. The ability to work...
FWS Weekly Resource Roundup n.5 – Focus on Free Press

FWS Weekly Resource Roundup n.5 – Focus on Free Press

Be Sociable, Share! Tweet I wrote a blog entry recently – “Shout! Scream! Yell! Your Company Depends On It!” – that focuses on the need to make people aware of your existence if you want them to hear your message.  What better way is there for a small business to get their existence noticed than to gain free press. In today’s weekly roundup, we’re going to focus on tools and ways to find reporters and bloggers and how to make yourself known to them – all in the name of gaining free press for your small business. First, when you’re going after free press, let’s make sure you understand how to approach the reporters and maximize your opportunity to be included as a source.  Also, what are some ways – other than the services below – to get mentioned in the press? Proven Tips for Getting Free Publicity on HARO 25 Ways to Get Press for Your Business How Do You Work With Reporters? With A Little Common Sense and Methodology. 11 alternatives for a news release And how about a tool to help you come up with a great headline for news releases and blog articles?  Check out the Emotional Marketing Value Headline Analyzer.  Your headline will be analyzed and scored based on the total number of EMV words it has in relation to the total number of words it contains. Now, how about some tools that will help you get free press?  The reporters and bloggers on most of these sites do not focus on a single industry – or even just business.  They run the gamut from breaking news,...
FWS Weekly Business Roundup n.4 – Focus on Strategic Planning

FWS Weekly Business Roundup n.4 – Focus on Strategic Planning

Be Sociable, Share! Tweet Rain, rain and more rain.  I wish it was nicer out, but at least it gave us some time to put together a decent list of resources and articles.  We’re going to focus on strategic planning this week.  It takes a long time to put together a fairly comprehensive strategic plan, so using the normally slow Summertime to start the strategic planning project is never a bad thing.   First – I just want to clarify something.  My clients often confuse business plans with operational plans with strategic plans.  The best way I usually describe it is that business plans talk about the business basics – general descriptions of the business, products and services, the market, competition, personnel, financial statements and projections and more.  Operational plans talk about execution.  What are we going to do this year and how are we going to do it?  They often incorporate sales and marketing, delivery and more.  Strategic plans, however, look at the long term.  Usually they look at a three to five year period.  It’s where you’re NOT today.  The strategic plan is designed to close the gap between where you are right now, and where you want to be. Let’s take a look at a few things that might help you along the way. Strategy execution → I have a quote in the signature of my personal email from Morris Chang.  “”Without strategy, execution is aimless. Without execution, strategy is useless.”   Strategic planning is useless if you don’t execute, and this is a great PowerPoint presentation on creating a culture of execution, and how it relates to your strategic plan....
72 Interview Questions to ask a Sales Rep

72 Interview Questions to ask a Sales Rep

Be Sociable, Share! Tweet Last week I posted about 20 questions to “see” during a sales interview.  This week, let’s get a bit more absolute and talk about questions you can really ask.  When you talk to an account exec it’s great to understand what makes them tick.  It’s good to remind them that there are no wrong answers to these questions (although, in reality, there can be).  It’s good to put them on the spot and see how they react. With that said, here’s the list of questions I use when I’m interviewing someone for an account executive role, account management role or a business development role.  You’ll notice that many of them help you align the interests, goals and personality of the prospect with your company culture and offerings.  I’d love to take credit for all of the questions, but they are really a mix of my own questions plus questions I’ve heard others ask over a long period of time. 72 Interview Questions to Ask a Sales Rep Do you prefer to find new accounts or farm existing accounts? What motivates you as a sales professional? What traits do you believe make up the most effective sales representatives? What sales quotas are you accustomed to? How comfortable are you with cold-calling? How long was the average sales cycle at your previous jobs? Who were your most profitable target markets at your previous jobs? How would you describe your sales technique? What are some common hurdles you’re facing right now as a sales representative in your current position? Can you give me an example of a complex...

A Visit to an Auto Repair Shop

Be Sociable, Share! TweetI’m thinking about starting an auto repair facility.  Well, not really, but yesterday I was struck with the thought that I could start one and have a pretty good opportunity to be successful. Our German car broke down.  Anyone who owns a German vehicle knows that repairs on these (generally) well built, fun to drive cars are ridiculously expensive compared to their Japanese and American brethren.  I looked up the error code on the Internet while I waited for AAA to flatbed it away and found that the most likely culprit of its total failure to move was a bad alternator. Fast forward three hours.  The auto repair facility called me and told me that it was, indeed, the alternator.  “The new one will cost $900 plus 2.5 hours of labor, so about $1,200 for the whole thing.” “$900 for an alternator,” I asked?  “Are there any aftermarket alternatives?” “That IS a rebuilt alternator – not a new one.  $900 is the best we can do,” replied the repair facility. I told them to go ahead – what choice did I have.  I needed my car.  I thought about it for a few minutes and went online to do my own search for a cheaper alternator.  Within five minutes I had found one for $200.  I quickly called the repair facility and told them.  “What’s the part number,” they asked? I gave them the part number.  “That’s not the right one,” I was told.  I asked for the right part number and got back to work.  Five minutes later I had found one for $320 from...

Sweat The Details

Be Sociable, Share! TweetI often find myself being reminded that simple lessons are the most important ones.Today we wrapped up exhibiting at a two day trade show that we were the primary sponsor of. As part of our sponsorship, we were given the opportunity to show a continuous loop presentation in a high traffic area.Less than 24 hours prior to the show, we found ourselves scrambling to provide the presentation in a format that the show organizers could use. Leading up to the show, the organizers, from our perspective, had been less than proactive and had not communicated to us the delivery method of the presentation. Our expectation was that we could provide a Powerpoint slideshow. Their expectation was that we would provide a video on a DVD.To the show organizers, this presentation was a very small component of a much bigger project. They had to ensure that pipe and drape, Internet connections, signage and other details were readily available to dozens of exhibitors. They had to make certain that the registration area was set up, that badges were printed and that seminar rooms were configured and ready to go.To us, the presentation was a big component of our sponsorship. This was a big deal and we had paid a lot of money for the opportunity. We ended up bringing our own computer and projector to allow attendees to see our presentation.Lesson learned – what seems like a very small detail to you in a larger initiative can be a critical component to your customer. If you don’t consider this in every customer facing engagement, you could easily create...
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